What is the background check process for Staples?


I passed an interview and I found as of two days ago that I am hired pending a background check. I'm very worried because I passed a one month background check at my previous internship for the legal department at a major insurance company in June 2010, and I haven't done anything at l that would negatively impact a background check since then. In fact, my credit has gone up, if that even matters. So there should be no problem with a short background check at Staples! I thought the background took only a day, and it's been two with no call back. What's going on? Also, in New York State are they required to inform you if you failed?

Written by David in Other - Careers & Employment


Better Answer

An employment background check conducted by a third-party screening company (not the employer) is subject to the Fair Credit Reporting Act. You can dispute information with the screening company just like you would with a credit bureau. If an employer turned you down because of something in your report, you should have received a letter along with instructions on how to get your report and how to dispute inaccuracies.

Again, this process only applies to companies that perform screenings for employers. If the employer, for example, checks public records itself and finds something about you on its own, you do not have the same rights under the FCRA. So, the important question is, who did your background check. You may also want to check public records yourself by going to the local court that provided the information to the background check company. See what the official court record says. If it's wrong or incomplete ask the clerk of court how to make corrections.

State laws may offer greater rights when it comes to obtaining public record information used to make an employment evaluation. For example, a California employer that obtains public record information, from any source, must give the employee or job applicant a chance to receive a copy of public records

A 2003 report by the Society for Human Resource Managers lists eight states that impose additional procedures for employment consumer reports, over and above the federal FCRA. These states are: California, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Oklahoma, and Washington. (Teresa Butler Stivarius, J.D. et al. “Background Checks: Four Steps to Basic Compliance in a Multistate Environment,” Society for Human Resource Management, Legal Report, March-April 2003, www.shrm.org, available to members only).

13. How can I get a copy of my background check?

If the employer uses information from the consumer report for an "adverse action" -- that is, denying the job applicant, terminating the employee, rescinding a job offer, or denying a promotion -- it must take the following steps:

Before the adverse action is taken, the employer must give the applicant a "pre-adverse action disclosure." This includes a copy of the report and an explanation of the individual's rights under the FCRA.

After the adverse action is taken, the individual must be given an "adverse action notice." This document must contain the name, address, and phone number of the employment screening company, a statement that this company did not make the adverse decision, rather that the employer did, and a notice that the individual has the right to dispute the accuracy or completeness of any of the information in the report.

In addition, recent amendments to the FCRA allow you to get a free employment report directly from the screening company. For more on free employment reports, see PRC Fact Sheet 6b, www.privacyrights.org/fs/fs6b-SpecReports.htm#8 .

Written by Shay


Other Answers

An employment background check conducted by a third-party screening company (not the employer) is subject to the Fair Credit Reporting Act. You can dispute information with the screening company just like you would with a credit bureau. If an employer turned you down because of something in your report, you should have received a letter along with instructions on how to get your report and how to dispute inaccuracies.

Again, this process only applies to companies that perform screenings for employers. If the employer, for example, checks public records itself and finds something about you on its own, you do not have the same rights under the FCRA. So, the important question is, who did your background check. You may also want to check public records yourself by going to the local court that provided the information to the background check company. See what the official court record says. If it's wrong or incomplete ask the clerk of court how to make corrections.

State laws may offer greater rights when it comes to obtaining public record information used to make an employment evaluation. For example, a California employer that obtains public record information, from any source, must give the employee or job applicant a chance to receive a copy of public records

A 2003 report by the Society for Human Resource Managers lists eight states that impose additional procedures for employment consumer reports, over and above the federal FCRA. These states are: California, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Oklahoma, and Washington. (Teresa Butler Stivarius, J.D. et al. “Background Checks: Four Steps to Basic Compliance in a Multistate Environment,” Society for Human Resource Management, Legal Report, March-April 2003, www.shrm.org, available to members only).

13. How can I get a copy of my background check?

If the employer uses information from the consumer report for an "adverse action" -- that is, denying the job applicant, terminating the employee, rescinding a job offer, or denying a promotion -- it must take the following steps:

Before the adverse action is taken, the employer must give the applicant a "pre-adverse action disclosure." This includes a copy of the report and an explanation of the individual's rights under the FCRA.

After the adverse action is taken, the individual must be given an "adverse action notice." This document must contain the name, address, and phone number of the employment screening company, a statement that this company did not make the adverse decision, rather that the employer did, and a notice that the individual has the right to dispute the accuracy or completeness of any of the information in the report.

In addition, recent amendments to the FCRA allow you to get a free employment report directly from the screening company. For more on free employment reports, see PRC Fact Sheet 6b, www.privacyrights.org/fs/fs6b-SpecReports.htm#8 .

Written by Shay